Tuesday, August 22, 2017

AI music

https://futurism.com/the-worlds-first-album-composed-and-produced-by-an-ai-has-been-unveiled/

About Amper: AI music



Example:



"...Amper can make music through machine learning in just seconds. "

"Anyone can create unique and professional music instantly with no experience required".

My 2 cents:


The sample sounds like every other pop song, the same pattern, and that same syrupy, overly dramatic, breathy vocal style that never seems to go away - it's so forceful in it's effort to portray emotion and convey sex appeal, it's like watching a soap on Telemundo. Yet, people describe this bad acting as 'powerful'.

Imagine someone pretending to be shot, someone who isn't an actor. That's how this style of singing comes across. But, if it's all you've ever heard and it's popular, people go along with it. But for me, I've heard sincere singers who don't cry their way through the song, and who don't follow the SAME freaking chord patterns.

This is the same kind of false drama that made American Idol popular. This is the formula for reality show propaganda -  they show the audience reacting emotionally, the judges tearing up, and everyone at home is fully convinced, or through willing suspension of disbelief, lives vicariously through the audience and the performer. This highly scripted artifice is the recipe for reality television and has set the stage for the now defunct music industry which is reinventing itself through fashion. And it's all contrived bullshit. Pay attention, how many films today claim to be based on a true story? People will believe what they want to believe, but it's especially helpful if someone is willing to twist the truth around like a balloon animal if you're struggling to see the pink elephant. Is that a real rock star? Sure it is. And we all discovered him together, here on American Idol. Who would have every thought this pickle-nosed plumber had it in him?



Reality culture harkens back to the old glamour shots of the 80s and 90s. People will go along with whatever makes them feel less pathetic for the moment. Social media has ushered in a culture of unapologetic vanity and selfies that lays the ground work for the triumphant return of the shameless hairspray and dolphin shorts of the eighties. And mullets. The younger generations will feign ironic self awareness until they eventually tire of apologizing and simply embrace it.

I understand the potential of using AI to make music. Probably my bigger gripe is the humans who are ruining what's left of music, and now empowering the process through machine learning to race to the shitty ending even faster. It's just another way to crank out pop singles and people will certainly consume it. Input the trend data, and it's time to make the doughnuts.

If you watch the video that shows how Amper works, the 'musician' selects the style in the beginning. Note that the style chosen in the video is actually called 'Cinematic Epic Driving' along side other mood preset options including 'Dark Dramatic', 'Dark Heroic', 'Dramatic tension'...
Hmm. Somebody's taking themself a little too seriously? How about a tribal tattoo and watch 300. And a YooHoo. These are the kids who grew up on Barney, right?

Here's a little more about the 'Epic Cinematic' music genre on wiki.

These are primary styles that describe the homogenized music of today. Truly, everything is awesome...er...epic.

Again, the idea is to convince the below average masses that they are experiencing creativity. Eventually, people can convince themselves that they are making something unique and great using presets, to the point where a trained musician will be laughed out of the room, and submediocrity will reign over true genius.

Unfortunately, the state of the music industry isn't conducive for professional aspirations such that would warrant dedication. Here's a sobering interview with Vinnie Colaiuta (skip to 26:55) who explains how digital music killed the industry. So instead, we have guitar hero for the masses and a parade of really proficient cover bands.

I remember my freshman year, the day I heard the beginning of 'Ice Ice Baby', and I thought the dining hall was playing 'Under Pressure', and my girlfriend at the time laughing at me because I didn't recognize what was obviously the pinnacle of pop right under my nose. My desperate attempt to explain was met with ridicule, that this was not an original creation of 1990, but the half-baked panning of a Queen/Bowie collaboration from the not too distant past, 1981. 


The future of entertainment is vicarious. No need for a savior when we can put you on the cross and the crown of thorns can be all yours! You may not ascend into heaven and reappear on earth again, but if you can draw a small crowd maybe someone will throw some rocks.








Monday, August 7, 2017

Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT): New device can heal with a single touch, and even repair brain injuries

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/08/07/miracle-device-can-heal-single-touch-and-even-repair-brain-injuries/537326001/

New device can heal with a single touch, and even repair brain injuries

And, it not only works on skin cells, it can restore any type of tissue, Chandan Sen, director of the Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell-Based Therapies, said. For example, the technology restored brain function in a mouse who suffered a stroke by growing brain cells on its skin.  
This is a breakthrough technology, because it's the first time cells have been reprogrammed in a live body. Current cell therapy methods are high risk, like those that introduce a virus, and include multiple steps, a new study published in Nature Nanotechnology points out. There are no known side effects to TNT and treatment is less than a second, Sen said.
“This technology does not require a laboratory or hospital and can actually be executed in the field," Sen said. "It’s less than 100 grams to carry and will have a long shelf life.” 
It is awaiting FDA approval, but Sen, who has been working on this for four years, expects TNT will be tested on humans within the year. He says he's talking with Walter Reed National Medical Center now. 
"We are proposing the use of skin as an agricultural land where you can essentially grow any cell of interest," Sen said.
Follow Ashley May on Twitter: @AshleyMayTweets
And, it not only works on skin cells, it can restore any type of tissue, Chandan Sen, director of the Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell-Based Therapies, said. For example, the technology restored brain function in a mouse who suffered a stroke by growing brain cells on its skin.  
This is a breakthrough technology, because it's the first time cells have been reprogrammed in a live body. Current cell therapy methods are high risk, like those that introduce a virus, and include multiple steps, a new study published in Nature Nanotechnology points out. There are no known side effects to TNT and treatment is less than a second, Sen said.
“This technology does not require a laboratory or hospital and can actually be executed in the field," Sen said. "It’s less than 100 grams to carry and will have a long shelf life.” 
It is awaiting FDA approval, but Sen, who has been working on this for four years, expects TNT will be tested on humans within the year. He says he's talking with Walter Reed National Medical Center now. 
"We are proposing the use of skin as an agricultural land where you can essentially grow any cell of interest," Sen said.
Follow Ashley May on Twitter: @AshleyMayTweets

Monday, July 24, 2017

animal translation in 10 years

From slashdot:
Devices that can talk to our pet dogs and cats could be less than 10 years away, according to a report Amazon commissioned that was co-authored by futurist William Higham. "Innovative products that succeed are based around genuine and major consumer needs," Higham wrote, noting the tremendous amounts already spent on our pets, and concluding, "Somebody is going to put this together." Amazon already sells one dubious device that converts human voices into meows using samples from 25 cats, according to the Guardian. (One reviewer who tested the device wrote that "the cat seems puzzled.") But Amazon's report also cites the work of Con Slobodchikoff, a professor emeritus in Northern Arizona University's biology department, who spent 30 years studying the behavior of prairie dogs. Slobodchikoff discovered prairie dogs have different words for colors and for species of predators, and is now already raising money to develop a translation device for pets.